Wildlife walks to celebrate Spring are on offer from Stroud Valleys Project in March. There will be a wild daffodil walk at Betty Daw’s Wood, a spring walk to Bull’s Cross, birdwatching beside the Severn, a geology walk at Heartbreak quarry and a lantern walk at Thistledown.

Director of projects, Clare Mahdiyone, said: “ We organise these walks so that local people have a chance to get closer to nature and see the wonderful array of wildlife which surrounds and supports us."

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Sunday 21st March, 10am – 1pm

Spring is just around the corner – spring to action with Stroud Valleys Project to shake off the winter blues with this brisk walk to Bull’s Cross.  Finally after that long, hard winter, spring is just around the corner.  During this 8km circular walk you can spot the first signs of nature’s amazing annual revival, walking through old beech woodlands and fields, with spectacular views.

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MONDAY 22nd MARCH, 10am-1pm


Have you ever heard of lower inferior oolite? What was first, the Silurian or the Jurassic? What is Gondwana when it’s at home? And, crucially, if you went for a swim in a Jurassic sea, would you be Liopleurodon’s dinner? If you have a visual impairment and want to learn fascinating facts about the rocks we walk on, Stroud Valleys Project have just the thing for you: a geology walk at Breakheart Quarry in Dursley.

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MONDAY 15th MARCH, 10am-3.30pm

Have you ever seen a yellow sea? If not, head with Stroud Valleys Project to Betty Daw’s Wood, where the carpet of sunshine yellow wild daffodils is certainly a sight to behold.

Beautiful carpets of wild daffodils, wall to wall sunshine (we hope!) and lovely company of likeminded people – the perfect way to discover hidden natural history gems. ‘Daft about daffodils’ is another walk for people with hearing impairment, organised by Stroud Valleys Project.

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Gardeners and wildlife enthusiasts worried about the decline of bees can come to a special illustrated talk to find out how to help them thrive in our gardens. The session is being organised by local environmental charity, Stroud Valleys Project in partnership with the Global Bee Project.

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Environmental charity Stroud Valleys Project is looking for more unemployed volunteers to sign up and help with planting hedgerows and putting in kissing gates thanks to a £5,000 grant from Gloucestershire County Council.

Director of projects Clare Mahdiyone said: ”We realised that we were getting more inquiries about volunteering since the recession started but had limited staff hours to cover the demand.

“This grant from the county council means that we can now run more practical conservation days for unemployed people who want to learn more about the countryside and leave a legacy like a kissing gate or a new hedge.”

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Don’t let unwanted 2010 diaries and calendars gather dust on your desk, drop them off at Stroud Valleys Project office instead, so others can use them.

The Great Diary Swap works like this: drop off unwanted 2010 diaries or calendars at Stroud Valleys Project. And if you need a new diary or calendar, pop into the SVP office at 8 Threadneedle Street on Stroud to get one. Simple! Saving resources and at the same time reducing the clutter on your desk. The swap will be running until the end of January.

 For more information please phone Ivi on 01453 753358.

Back by popular demand – come and de-stress before Christmas with Stroud Valleys Project’s Solstice walk. 

Christmas is just around the corner but there really is no need to stress out about the conveyor belt of cooking, baking, cleaning and buying the perfect pair of socks for Uncle Bert. Forget the constant pressure to make Christmas perfect, come out with Stroud Valleys Project instead to celebrate the Solstice on this brisk walk to the Heavens. Please wear walking boots and waterproofs.

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It’s National Tree Week and the challenge has gone out to tree lovers to join in a world record breaking planting event on Saturday 5 December between 11am and 12noon. Stroud Valleys Project is joining in with BBC Breathing Spaces as part of  nationwide challenge to help to set a new record for planting the most trees in one hour.



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Environmental charity Stroud Valleys Project has recruited a new wildlife specialist to help with their latest conservation project at Frampton-on-Severn.

Forty-four year old Mark Claridge, who lives in Eastington, joined the charity last month after completing a two years Masters Degree in Biodiversity, Conservation and Eco-tourism where he was based in Thailand.

Mark Claridge“I had known about SVP for a while and I liked that it is a small organisation with a good track record of working with local people on interesting projects. After two years doing research on the impact of tourism on coral reefs I wanted to do something that was practical and the idea of working closely with local people appealed to me,” explained Mark.

Before deciding to his Masters degree Mark worked at Woodchester Park Badger Research Project, his first wildlife job after completing his original degree in Wildlife Conservation.

Mark joins Nadine Smykatz - Kloss to work in and around Frampton-on-Severn on a project to restore traditional landscape features, improve habitats and establish wildlife corridors on the land left by past gravel and aggregates extraction. Both Mark and Nadine’s posts are funded from  the £122,656 grant awarded to SVP by the Aggregates Levy Sustainability Fund (ALSF) earlier this year.

Stroud Valleys Project is a limited company,
registered in England and Wales.    

Registered number: 2224016    

Registered charity number: 900107

Stroud Valleys Project,
8 Threadneedle Street,

Tel: 01453 753358

Fax: 01453 755641

Email: info@stroudvalleysproject.org

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